Director in Focus: Agnieszka Holland

One of the world’s most critically acclaimed and commercially successful women behind a camera, multiple Oscar-nominee Agnieszka Holland is also one of the most eclectic filmmakers working today. Initially an assistant to her mentor, Andrzej Wajda, in her Polish homeland (including her uncredited work on Man of Marble), she left following the 1981 declaration of martial law and has since made films in Germany, France, the UK and Hollywood, as well as directing numerous episodes of prestige American TV such as The Wire, Treme and House of Cards. Her TV work also includes the three-part Czech mini-series Burning Bush.

To honour the release of her latest film, Mr. Jones, this retrospective takes in the films linked above; her three earliest features – Provincial Actors, Fever and A Woman Alone; one of her most celebrated films, the Golden Globe-winning Europa Europa; and her Oscar-nominated works In Darkness and Angry Harvest.

Angry Harvest

Angry Harvest

An act of kindness becomes a terrifying trap in Agnieszka Holland’s Oscar-nominated drama about a woman on the run through World War II Poland who becomes an object of fascination and possession for a local farmer.

Burning Bush

Burning Bush

Agnieszka Holland’s searing three-part opus recounts the fiery sacrifice of a young Prague student protesting the Soviet occupation of Czechoslovakia in 1969.

Europa Europa

Europa Europa

Truth is stranger than fiction in Agnieszka Holland’s Golden Globe-winning masterwork about a young Jewish man who survives World War II as a member of the Hitler Youth.

Fever

Fever

Released in 1981 and immediately banned by the communist government, Agnieszka Holland’s striking film about anarchists and a bomb is a powerful exploration of revolutionary ideals.

In Darkness

In Darkness

Nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the 2012 Academy Awards, Agnieszka Holland’s starkly realistic World War II drama explores a complex true tale of Holocaust heroism.

Man of Marble

Man of Marble

Agnieszka Holland collaborated with the great Andrzej Wajda on this powerful Citizen Kane-like reckoning with the legacy of a lionised construction worker and the hypocrisy of the Soviet regime, which won the FIPRESCI Prize at Cannes 1978.

Mr. Jones

Mr. Jones

Veteran director Agnieszka Holland unearths an essential chapter of history with this biopic about Welsh journalist Gareth Jones and his efforts to expose Soviet atrocities during the 1930s.

Provincial Actors

Provincial Actors

Agnieszka Holland’s compelling, FIPRESCI Prize-winning debut film goes behind the scenes of a theatre troupe to explore the human cost of censorship and ideological conflict in communist Poland.

A Woman Alone

A Woman Alone

Banned for six years, then censored by the state when it finally aired on television, Agnieszka Holland’s last film before emigrating from Poland examines the desolate lives of the poor and disabled during the country’s Solidarity era.