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Richard Hamilton

UK, 1969 (MIFF 1971, Artists)

Director: James Scott

Richard Hamilton is one of the forerunners of the pop-art movement, whose paintings have long revealed a preoccupation with mass media.

Hamilton closely collaborated with the making of the film and supplies the commentary himself. Part of the film deals with "Swinging London", based on the public trial of Rolling Stone, Mick Jagger, and art dealer, Robert Fraser.

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