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AUNT TULA

Spain, 1965 (MIFF 1966, Programme 4)

Director: Miguel Picazo

La Tin Tula is the Spanish cinema's homage to Miguel de Unamuno, one of Spain's greatest writers, on the centenary of his birth. The novel from which the film was adapted, delineates a well-known Span­ish character: the spinster who keeps the family together, brings up the nephews, and - her task completed - ends up facing the rest of her life alone. It is the portrait of a woman bound to her beliefs.

The film limits the action to a single summer in Aunt Tula's life. Her sister Rosa has died and she invites her brother-in-law Ramiro, her niece Tulita, and nephew Ramirin, to come and live with her. But living together becomes more difficult each day . . .

This is the first film Miguel Picazo has directed, and his observations of Spanish provincial life are shrewdly drawn. For his title role he has selected Aurora Bautisa, the most outstanding dramatic actress of the Spanish theatre.

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