Skip to main content

The Coloured Pencils

Australia, 1989 (MIFF 1990, Fiction)

Director: Belinda Alexandrovics

The Coloured Pencils is an insight into a child's world. Annie, the main character, is an eight year old.

Annie is poor, unlike the prissy, spiteful Wendy who displays her pristine set of 72 Derwent pencils with gay superiority. When Annie is pushed on to Wendy in the long grass, Wendy drops her pencils and this gives Annie the opportunity to take something she always wanted, 72 Derwent pencils. Annie's conscience gives her no rest and when she throws them into the creek, something awful and unexpected happens. . . they don't sink!

The film is based on the popular children's story 72 Derwents by Kay Arthur, a Melbourne author whose stories for children have been marketed internationally. It is a story which the young identify with because of the engaging narrative and the child's eye view, and through which adults find they can rediscover their own childhood experiences.

See also...

Storm in a Teacup

Frieda seems to have a spark in her eye as she heads off to the local swimming pool. She meets with friend Cecil, but their pleasure is interrupted by some snoops from the croquet club (to which Cec ... More »

The Fruit of Our Labour

Set in the late 1950's, II Frutto Del Nostra Lavoro centers on the life of Lina - the daughter of Italian migrants who live in rural Victoria. ... Pressured into marrying a young Italian farmer, Lina ... More »

Bonza

The members of this family have two things in common; one, they cannot communicate with each other, and two, they all love Bonza. This is a frantically paced comedy about the trials of an Australian ... More »

Forget Me Not

Ernie has such severe problems with short term memory that his reality is totally confused. This short fiction from Swinburne touches on themes like those in the "documentary" The Man Wlio Mistook ... More »

The Promise

A touching look at a one-parent family and a trip on Sydney's monorail thrown in. ... More »

Life On Earth As I Know It

A daggy delight and refreshing antidote to Australian cinema's "rites of passage" sub-genre. Droll, unaffectedly deadpan narration accompanies some unexpected glimpses into the situation of a young ... More »

Select a festival
Search The Film Archive
Browse By Director