Select a festival
Search The Film Archive
Browse By Director

CINEMA OF UNEASE - NEW ZEALAND CINEMA

New Zealand / UK, 1995 (MIFF 1995, Buried Treasures - The Century of Cinema)

Director: Sam Neill, Judy Rymer

Framed as a road movie chronicling a return trip to New Zealand, this film starts from the fact that Sam Neill, (the only director in the series for the century of cinema whose career is actually acting) remembers his childhood film-going as marked by an absence of images of New Zealand on the screen. Before 1977, there was little by documentary production from the National Fiim Unit, much of it devoted to con­structing idealised images of New Zealand as 'God's own country'. Underpinning Neili's explo­ration of New Zealand's modern film culture is a series of perceptions of what sets the country apart: its relatively small and scattered popula­tion, its surviving Indigenous people—the Maori—and, not least, the psychological sense of isolation from the rest of the world. In his very personal journey through the real and cinematic landscape of the country, we discover that in Neili's view these are the vital characteristics that have shaped and defined New Zealand cine­ma and he offers clips from dozens of films from the last three decades-Smash Palace through Utit, The Quiet Earth, Vigil Angel at My Table and beyond—to illustrate his own contribution to the cinema of unease.

See also...

A PERSONAL JOURNEY WITH MARTIN SCORSESE THROUGH AMERICAN MOVIES

USA, 1995
When approached to direct the American contribution to the BFi's Century of Cinema project, Martin Scorsese (a natural choice given his remarkable film knowledge and passion) decided the only possibl… More »

TYPICALLY BRITISH

UK, 1995
Francois Truffaut, Stephen Frears reminds us, once observed that the words 'British' and cinema' seemed incompatible. Frears' celebra­tion of one hundred years of British Cinema is an elegant and… More »

KOREAN CINEMA

Korea, 1995
... ... The film is founded on perception of the very close connection between Korea's modern history and the development of Korean cinema. Jang Sun-Woo's view of history negotiates its way around al… More »

© Melbourne International Film Festival 2013.

Site by MeccaMedialight. Powered by Textstem CMS.