Films By Norman McLaren

Made without commentary or dialogue, this film is a simple ballet of a youth and a kitchen chair. The ensuing struggle, first for mastery and then for understanding forms the action of the film. The technique is a modified form of the "pixillation" animation formerly used in NcLaren's Neighbours. ... Read more
McLaren used pixillation techniques in this comedic duel between a young boy and a kitchen chair. ... Read more
A surrealistic abstract with an unusual sound track consisting of synthetic sound in conjunction with music for saxophone. ... Read more
After the brilliant cinematic experiment of Pas de Deux, Norman McLaren once again films dancers - this time slowing down their movements to a quarter of their speed in reality. The original choreography of the ballet to Rachmaninoff's music "Spring Waters" was rearranged by David Holmes, and, to suit the mood of he film, the music was replaced by Albinoni's Adagio. ... Read more
Arabesque-like images flash upon the screen, then suddenly disappear. An impression remains in the viewer's eye, like the burning of a bright light after it has been extinguished. A work of pure imagination. ... Read more
One of the earlier of the McLaren experimental films. An abstract film, made without the use of a camera, in which "boogie" played by Albert Amnions and "doodle*' drawn by Norman McLaren combine to make a rhythmic, brightly coloured film experiment. ... Read more
In the canon a melody begun by one voice or instrument is echoed by another, beginning one beat or several measures later than the one before. In this film, McLaren illustrates the principle of the canon. ... Read more
A cartoon film, hand-drawn in colour by Norman McLaren, in which a hen &ndash: and even as an egg with feet &ndash: dances to the old &ndash: time waltzes and reels of French-Canadian barn dance music. ... Read more
Geometric shapes build to the form of a hen. To the tune of old-time waltzes a hen, now a leghorn, then a Plymouth Rock, later a simple egg with feet, dances and reels. This McLaren-designed animation was conceived to reflect the primitiveness and naivety of the music that inspired it. ... Read more
The spectral island wakes to mysterious life, flickers in a corpse &ndash: candle light and fades again into the dark. ... Read more
"Mon Merle", an old French folksong, sung by the Trio Lyrique of Montreal, tells the story of a happy-go-lucky bird who loses his neck, beak. wings and eyes but immediately sets about retrieving them. To his astonishment they return in duplicate and triplicate. Norman McLaren in his inimitable style has used simple cut-outs on a pastel background to portray the action of the song. ... Read more
Lines in pure design — an attempt by Norman McLaren to create art interesting pattern entirely from straight lines engraved directly on plain black film. ... The effect in is of decorous ballet through close prescribed figures The lines whirl, seperate, circle and close up with infinite precision and grace. In Lines Horizontal the movement suggests a tenuous, effortless minuet. ... Read more
McLaren's first film for the NFB was this publicity clip for Canada Post. Non-abstract symbols drawn with pen on clear 35mm stock were superimposed on a painted background. ... Read more
Norman McLaren's 59th film, which opened the 1983 World Film Festival in Montreal, is one of the most ambitious in his ... long career, which started in 1933. The film is based on the Greek myth of the native youth who falls in love with his own image, and becomes the victim of excessive self love. ... As in his previous dance film, "Pas De Deux', 1967, McLaren has chosen dance over animation as t... Read more
A parable in which McLaren uses people and natural backgrounds, as well as a few drawn ones, for the first time. Sound is drawn direct on to the film. ... Read more
Possibly McLaren's best known film, it is a film without words to show the futility of violence for settling quarrels. This Cold War parable depicts two neighbours who tolerate each other until a flower emerges on the border between their properties. ... Read more
Ostensibly, Norman McLaren intends to welcome the audience, but is frustrated by the microphone which exhibits surprising temper, reluctance and guile. ... Read more
McLaren appears on a stage but cannot make his planned speech on account of a feisty, bad-tempered microphone that finally has him chasing it around the stage. Befitting a cartoon sketch, McLaren uses animation techniques to bring an object to lifc.with amusing consequences. ... Read more
Two of Canada's leading ballet dancers, Margaret Mercier and Vincent Warren, are clad in white and their pas de deux filmed against a black stage. For his 48th experimental film, Norman McLaren plays with multiple images, using the optical printer to expose individual frames up to eleven times. ... Read more
McLaren employed a multi-image technique to film two ballet performets in this study in the grace of dance. It was filmed against a black backdrop with rear lighting oudining the white-clad dancers. McLaren then exposed individual frames up to 11 times to create the multi-image effect. ... Read more
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