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Films Screened In 1995

Fragments of Grandmother (Nerida Moore, 1994)
Fragments of Grandmother is a beautifully crafted film dealing with the fragments of our lives, our families, our memories, our words, our thoughts and our possessions, and ultimately how these stran… Read more

FRANK & OLLIE (Theodore Thomas, 1994)
... ... The Walt Disney Company became the embodiment of family entertainment with its classic animated features during the 1930s, '40s and '50s. This team of creative artists trans­formed what h… Read more

FRESH (Boaz Yakin, 1994)
From the moment light suffuses the screen, director Boaz Yakin transforms what could have been just another gritty, urban scenario into something mystical and enduring. Reimagining the 'ghetto' genre… Read more

FUNNY BONES (Peter Chelsom, 1994)
Much darker and quirkier than his previous film, the director of Hear My Song has cre­ated a truly marvellous comedy that manages to be a wildly comedic tale about the search for comic invention … Read more

GLUED TO THE TELLY (Jo Laws, 1995)
... ... Ahhh Television! This very funny film goes where no television documentary has ever gone before, into the innermost sanctum of the Australian home-the lounge room. Glued To The Telly explores… Read more

GOOD MEN, GOOD WOMEN (Hou Hsiao-hsien, 1995)
Based on a real-life love tragedy, Good Men, Good Women continues Hou's exploration of history from the ordinary citizen's point-of-view. To this he adds his new interest, pioneered in The Puppetmast… Read more

Great Moments in Science - Falling Cats (Andrew Horne, 1995)
Next time your cat falls out the window make sure it does it at least seven storeys up. Karl Kruszelnicki shows us how high rise buildings and open windows provide a strange way to test the aerodynam… Read more

Growing (Alison Hempstock, 1994)
The simple pleasures of growing food in the gar­den are shown to be beautiful as well as practi­cal in this evocative hand drawn pastel animation. ... Read more

Headlong (Simon Raby, 1995)
Yet another accomplished short from New Zealand. Headlong reworks the risky road- movie genre narrowly avoiding cliche and false sentiment. ... When a daggy and 'snaggy' bloke picks up an angry and a… Read more

HELLO PHOTO (Nina Davenport, 1994)
When photographer Nina Davenport won a scholarship to travel to India she had no intentions of making a film. But just in case, she added an old silent movie camera and a profes­sional walkman to… Read more

Hinekaro Goes on a Picnic and Blows Up Another Obelisk (Christine Parker, 1995)
Have you ever eaten mutton bird? Fished for eels with a spider's web? There's a lot more I bet you haven't done or imagined in this visually astounding work based on a short story by Ken Hulme. Hinek… Read more

Hollywood Hotel (, 1995)
Melbourne filmmaker Fiona Hergstrom was so fascinated by the inhabitants of this St Hilda hotel that she decided to move in and observe their daily life first hand. ... Funded by Film Victoria's Inde… Read more

Home (David Ofek, 1994)
Three generations of a family are confined into an exiled space. Sealed in their living room they watch the bombing of Baghdad and their old home on the television. ... A subtle insight into differin… Read more

Home Stories (Mathias Müller, )
The protagonists of Hollywood melodramas of the fifties and sixties are coming home a chore­ography of glances and gestures ... Read more

Hunt for the Doomsday Asteroid (Tim Haines, 1994)
The mother of all natural disasters might well be the collision of the Earth with a large asteroid. Thousands of these huge objects swarm across the Earth's orbital track around the Sun. The extincti… Read more

I Don't Know Where, Or When, Or How... (Zelimir Gvardiol, 1994)
Fatigue of life. Impotence. Evocative close-up images of the physical effects of age layer this film about elderly people. They are living in high inflation, small pensions and the indignity of finan… Read more

I JUST WASN'T MADE FOR THESE TIMES (Don Was, 1994)
... ... Avoiding the conventions of music documen­tary, I Just Wash for Made for These Times magnifi­cently captures the essence of Beach Boy Brian Wilson's musical genius and eccentricity. A… Read more

I Love My Work (Ann Marie Fleming, 1994)
A joyful tilt at the expectations that can weigh down (literally) a single working woman. Fleming points her stick figure animation at a few of life's major small moments and creates magic. ... Read more

I Will Survive (Sean Roe, 1994)
Exposing a whole new dimension to karaoke, this bravura prick-synching performance brings a particular 90's resonance to a 70's classic . ... Read more

Ikonostasis-Live (Thomas Steiner, 1994)
In the tradition of Walter Ruttman and Dziga Vertov, Steiner uses the camera as a brush, in the manner of conceptual art. Rarely focussed and constantly moving the camera records reflected light in a… Read more

Iron Waltz (Ruth Louz, 1994)
The iron lady unplugged controls her domestics' bliss. Slave driver and chore checker, she keeps her three workers starching and steaming with her steel claddings and scorching glares. But escape is … Read more

John (Genevieve Mersch, 1995)
A young woman in Brussels refuses to relinquish a summer relationship with her American boyfriend in Boston. Due in large part to the outstanding performance of Dominique Baeyens as 'Juliette', this … Read more

Jukebox (Run Wrake, 1994)
Jukebox is an hilariously sinister dream landscape where perspective is collapsed and concertmaed into 'Leger' styled animated figures that seem to strike up inappropriate conversations that sug­… Read more

Jumping (Osamu Tezuka, 1984)
A tour de force of technique and the imagination. Influenced by the experimental hungarian animation, The Fly, Jumping utilizes the point-of-view gag to convey a breathtaking view of how powerful a c… Read more

Kimba The White Lion (Osamu Tezuka, 1954)
The 3rd TV series Tezuka created with Mushi, Kimba was the first colour anime series made in Japan. Highly memorable for Australian kids who saw it during its early 70s broadcast, Kimba con­taine… Read more

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