International Films

Every year, MIFF’s programmers travel far and wide to bring the freshest global cinema back to Melbourne. These international films – from Europe, the Middle East and Africa, the Asia-Pacific region, North America and Latin America – represent the cream of the crop of world cinema, and include award winners from the most prestigious film festivals, your new and old favourite directors, famous faces and far-flung places.

Go beyond Hollywood, and see another side of contemporary world cinema at #MIFF2019.

Abou Leila

Abou Leila

Setting off into the Sahara in search of an elusive terrorist, two childhood friends confront their traumas in this road movie meets meditative-absurdist western, which screens at MIFF straight from Cannes Critics’ Week.

Adam

Adam

Two women, marginalised by Moroccan society, transform each other’s lives in Maryam Touzani’s impressive debut feature about the courage and compassion it takes to move beyond living with grief and shame.

aKasha

aKasha

Just your not-so-average romantic comedy about a South Sudanese rebel soldier, his long-suffering girlfriend and the prized AK-47 called Nancy that stands between them.

Alice

Alice

Josephine Mackerras’s SXSW Grand Jury Prize winner is an intimate story of one woman’s empowerment that also destigmatises common ideas about sex work.

American Woman

American Woman

Sienna Miller, Christina Hendricks and Aaron Paul lead a sterling cast in Jake Scott’s engrossing tale of a single mother grappling with her worst nightmare.

And Then We Danced

And Then We Danced

A young dancer’s outlook is challenged by his intense attraction to a rival in Georgia, a country that remains deeply rooted in tradition, in this contender for Cannes’ Queer Palm.

Angelo

Angelo

An 18th-century African boy, kidnapped into slavery, rises through the ranks of Viennese high society in this powerful, formally stunning work.

Animals

Animals

Alia Shawkat and Holliday Grainger give a beautiful authenticity to Australian director Sophie Hyde’s adaptation of the acclaimed novel that Caitlin Moran described as "Withnail & I for girls".

The Art of Self-Defense

The Art of Self-Defense

“Jesse Eisenberg plays a wimp whose desperate bid to man up compels him to join an off-kilter karate studio in this smart, machismo-critiquing cult comedy … dark, sinister, and disarmingly hilarious.” – Variety

Baby

Baby

Executive produced by Hou Hsiao-hsien (The Assassin, MIFF 2015) and anchored by a powerhouse performance from popular star Yang Mi, this propulsive social thriller examines the far-reaching consequences of China’s one-child policy.

The Beach Bum

The Beach Bum

“A collaboration between Matthew McConaughey and filmmaker Harmony Korine, this portrait of a dissolute poet pissin’ away the days in Margaritaville and Miami is a match made in heaven.” – Rolling Stone

Beanpole

Beanpole

Winner of both the coveted Best Director award and the FIPRESCI prize in Cannes’ Un Certain Regard section, Russian director Kantemir Balagov’s second feature is a fiercely devastating tale of two women rebuilding their lives in the shadow of World War II.

Beats

Beats

Journey back to the halcyon daze of the UK’s 90s rave scene with this nostalgic coming-of-age tale, executive produced by Steven Soderbergh and set to the most electrifying sounds of the Trainspotting era.

Bellbird

Bellbird

MIFF Accelerator alumnus Hamish Bennett makes his feature directorial debut with this tender drama about grief-stricken dairy farmers, a follow-up to his award-winning short film Ross & Beth (MIFF 2014).

Benjamin

Benjamin

A fable of faltering romance and a withering satire of the artistic temperament from UK comic Simon Amstell.

Brittany Runs a Marathon

Brittany Runs a Marathon

An audience award-winner at Sundance, Brittany Runs a Marathon is a warm, funny and relatable comedy about body positivity, self-love and acceptance.

A Brother's Love

A Brother's Love

Winner of the special Coup de Coeur award at this year’s Cannes Un Certain Regard, French-Canadian filmmaker Monia Chokri’s rapid-fire comedy of thirtysomething romance and sibling rivalry evokes the exuberant energy of her sometime collaborator Xavier Dolan.

Daffodils

Daffodils

New Zealand’s smash-hit musical is a feelgood, nostalgic romance set to some of the biggest hits in Kiwi pop history.

Dirty God

Dirty God

Dutch director Sacha Polak (Hemel, Zurich) makes her English-language debut with this visually expressive, emotionally raw and thematically topical account of a South London woman’s determined fight to reclaim her life.

Divine Love

Divine Love

After dazzling MIFF 2016 audiences with the pulsating Neon Bull, Gabriel Mascaro turns his vivid gaze to religious raves and evangelical sex therapy in this playful, probing foray into science fiction.

Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountains

Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountains

“As mesmerizing and immersive as the legendary 14th century landscape painting that inspired it … a vast canvas that stands up to close scrutiny both as a series of snapshots of its characters’ personalities and as the panorama of a society undergoing radical change.” – The Hollywood Reporter 

Dying to Survive

Dying to Survive

An enterprising businessman takes on Big Pharma to provide cancer patients with expensive, life-extending medicine in this socially conscious drug-smuggling drama, which is based on a touching and astonishing true story, and earned more than $450 million at the Chinese box office.

End of the Century

End of the Century

An erotically charged romance across two time periods set among the sun-drenched beaches and architecture of Barcelona.

A Family Tour

A Family Tour

Director Ying Liang is inspired by his own recent autobiographical history in this poignant portrait of an unusual family reunion that occurs despite exile, threats and the grief born of forced separation.

Fire Will Come

Fire Will Come

Winner of the Un Certain Regard Jury Prize at Cannes, the latest from Franco-Spanish auteur Oliver Laxe returns the director to his Galician roots for a mesmerising tale of a mysterious arsonist and the forces of nature.

First Love

First Love

The unstoppable, incomparable Takashi Miike returns to MIFF with a sweet and gentle love story. Only joking! First Love is characteristic Miike: a brutal, bloody, hyper-violent and hyperreal tale of a boxer and a call girl caught between the yakuza, the triads and all-out anarchy.

Flesh Out

Flesh Out

A young Mauritanian woman wakes up to the misogyny of her society’s beauty standards in this emotionally rich debut feature from Michela Occhipinti.

Fourteen

Fourteen

Two twentysomething women watch their teenage friendship fade away in the latest keenly observed feature from critic-turned-filmmaker Dan Sallitt (The Unspeakable Act, MIFF 2013).

Frankie

Frankie

Starring Isabelle Huppert as a famous French actress, Frankie is the latest intimately observed, tenderly wrought drama from Ira Sachs – with Marisa Tomei, Brendan Gleeson, Greg Kinnear and Jérémie Renier also featuring.

The Gasoline Thieves

The Gasoline Thieves

A lovesick Mexican teen is lured into the volatile underground of oil bandits in this suspenseful Tribeca award winner.

Ghost Town Anthology

Ghost Town Anthology

Continuing to prove one of Canada’s most intriguing auteurs, MIFF regular Denis Côté examines the pervasive influence of grief on a tiny Québécois town.

Give Me Liberty

Give Me Liberty

Heartfelt and hilarious, Give Me Liberty channels the spirit of the Czech New Wave in its freewheeling tale of life on the edges of Midwestern America.

God Exists, Her Name is Petrunya

God Exists, Her Name is Petrunya

This multiple Berlinale award winner from North Macedonia is a savage and hilarious feminist polemic against patriarchal control.

Goldie

Goldie

Fashion model and Instagram sensation Slick Woods makes her explosive film debut in a quintessentially New York tale about chasing a dream.

The Halt

The Halt

The year is 2034. In Lav Diaz’s sci-fi vision of future, a deadly flu has killed millions, while the sun has stopped shining over South-East Asia. With the Philippines plunged into perpetual darkness, a despotic president grasps his chance to turn the desolated country into an oppressive dystopia.

Happy New Year, Colin Burstead

Happy New Year, Colin Burstead

“Ben Wheatley strips things way back for his nerve-raddled family reunion comedy, and the result is one of his best, most fluid films.” – Variety

His Lost Name

His Lost Name

Previously working with Hirokazu Kore-eda on MIFF 2013’s Like Father, Like Son and MIFF 2015’s Our Little Sister, filmmaker Nanako Hirose makes her feature directorial debut with a drama about family, secrets and trauma.

Hotel By The River

Hotel By The River

The latest from MIFF favourite Hong Sang-soo is a lyrical meditation on family, friendship and the eternal, which won Gi Ju-bong the Best Actor award at Locarno.

House of Hummingbird

House of Hummingbird

Winner of multiple awards from Berlin and Busan to Tribeca and beyond, House of Hummingbird is the debut feature from one of South Korea’s most celebrated new directors.

The Invisible Life of Eurídice Gusmão

The Invisible Life of Eurídice Gusmão

Brazilian filmmaker Karim Aïnouz took out Cannes’ prestigious Un Certain Regard prize with this exquisite tropical melodrama about two sisters who share an unshakable bond in an oppressively patriarchal culture.

It Must Be Heaven

It Must Be Heaven

A Palestinian filmmaker goes globetrotting only to be shadowed by reminders of home in this very meta, Cannes award-winning film.

Jinpa

Jinpa

Acclaimed Tibetan director Pema Tseden veers away from his usual naturalistic style in this metaphysical road movie produced by Wong Kar-wai.

Journey to a Mother's Room

Journey to a Mother's Room

A touching portrait of a mother-daughter relationship and life in an empty nest from one of Catalan cinema’s up-and-coming directors.

The Kill Team

The Kill Team

Oscar-nominated director Dan Krauss presents a fictionalised version of his award-winning war-crimes documentary of the same name, featuring a bone-chilling performance from Alexander Skarsgård.

Kursk

Kursk

Thomas Vinterberg directs Matthias Schoenaerts, Léa Seydoux, Colin Firth and Max von Sydow in this captivating and suspenseful true tale, recounting the final hours of the supposedly unsinkable K-141 Kursk submarine as it descends to the bottom of the Barents Sea.

Land of Ashes

Land of Ashes

“Surely one of the most entrancing first features of the year … teems with verdant, ungovernable life, made somehow more magically intense by the constant, hovering proximity of death.” – Variety

Litigante

Litigante

Just one of Silvia’s problems would be enough to break most people – she’s under investigation for corruption, her mother is terminally ill and refusing treatment, and her five-year-old son is starting to ask awkward questions about his father.

Long Day’s Journey Into Night

Long Day’s Journey Into Night

After the otherworldly allure of MIFF 2016’s Kaili Blues, poet turned filmmaker Bi Gan returns with another entrancing visit to China’s Guizhou province – as constructed around an astonishing 55-minute single take in mesmerising 3D.

Manta Ray

Manta Ray

Delving into Thailand’s treatment of Rohingyan refugees, cinematographer Phuttiphong Aroonpheng turns director with this visually stunning drama, which won the Orizzonti Prize for Best Film at last year’s Venice Film Festival.

Memories of My Body

Memories of My Body

Winner of UNESCO’s Cultural Diversity Award at the 2018 Asia Pacific Screen Awards, Indonesian auteur Garin Nugroho’s Memories of My Body dances through gender stereotypes, societal oppression and his homeland’s recent political history.

Monos

Monos

Winner of a Sundance Special Jury Award, Monos is a visually astounding, thrillingly original fever dream situated somewhere between Lord of the Flies, Apocalypse Now and Aguirre, the Wrath of God.

The Mountain

The Mountain

Jeff Goldblum stars as a charismatic lobotomist on an oddball roadtrip across 1950s America in The Mountain, the latest work of madness and magic from cinematic iconoclast Rick Alverson.

Nina Wu

Nina Wu

Direct from Cannes’ Un Certain Regard, The Road to Mandalay (MIFF 2017) director Midi Z returns with something very different from his celebrated ultra-low budget projects: a stylish, riveting thriller about a young actress losing control.

Noah Land

Noah Land

Winning Best Actor and Best Screenplay at the Tribeca Film Festival, this Turkish drama contemplates faith, trust and the trappings of masculinity, earning comparisons to Abbas Kiarostami’s filmography for its poignant, contemplative approach.

Once in Trubchevsk

Once in Trubchevsk

Larisa Sadilova’s first film in nearly a decade is a richly textured portrait of a daring woman’s desires as they play out within the confines of small-town Russian life.

The Orphanage

The Orphanage

Emerging Afghan filmmaker Shahrbanoo Sadat delights with an 80s-set mixture of realism and inspired Bollywood-style musical, set on the streets of Kabul.

Our Mothers

Our Mothers

Winner of the Camera d’Or, Our Mothers takes a sensitive look at the effect of Guatemala’s brutal military dictatorship on the country’s women, who hold history together with resilience and dignity in the face of violence.

Papicha

Papicha

“A feminist portrait, Papicha seduces especially for its energy, its freshness and the charisma of its lead character.” – Cineuropa

Particles

Particles

Teenage kicks and the Large Hadron Collider come together for the first time in this striking mix of coming-of-age drama and eerie sci-fi dread from adventurous new voice, Blaise Harrison.

Photograph

Photograph

Reuniting with Bollywood star Nawazuddin Siddiqui (Manto, MIFF 2018; Gangs of Wasseypur, MIFF 2012), The Lunchbox director Ritesh Batra contemplates love, life, and the complexities of culture, religion and class on the subcontinent.

Port Authority

Port Authority

Executive-produced by Martin Scorsese, Port Authority follows Fionn Whitehead’s young drifter Paul as he arrives in New York, where he is drawn to the glamorous dancer Wye and her friends.

Queen of Hearts

Queen of Hearts

Trine Dyrholm is magnetic in this Sundance Audience Award winner about the abuse of power and just how far we’ll go to hold on to our comfortable existence.

Ray & Liz

Ray & Liz

Revered photographer Richard Billingham revisits his coming of age in a chaotic council flat in the 1980s, portraying it with a tender, melancholy beauty full of subtle humour and pathos.

A Regular Woman

A Regular Woman

The real-life ‘honour’ killing of a young Turkish-Kurdish woman is given a unique narrative treatment by German-American filmmaker Sherry Hormann in this empathetic and uncompromising film.

Retrospekt

Retrospekt

A bold psychological drama about women, work and domestic violence that rejects clichés and treads a thin line between experimental and narrative filmmaking.

Rosie

Rosie

Homelessness takes centre stage in this heartbreaking and urgent portrait of one working-class family’s increasingly desperate search for sanctuary amid Ireland’s housing crisis.

Share

Share

“An uncommonly knotty and fiercely intelligent story of assault and blame in the social media age.” – The Playlist

Skin

Skin

Jamie Bell is outstanding in this expansion of Guy Nattiv’s 2019 Oscar-winning short inspired by the true story of reformed neo-Nazi Byron Widner.

Song Without a Name

Song Without a Name

The first film directed by a Peruvian woman to screen at Cannes is a visually striking, elegiac look back at Peru’s not-so-distant dark history.

The Souvenir

The Souvenir

Tilda Swinton stars alongside her daughter, Honor Swinton Byrne – a revelation – in Joanna Hogg’s intimate semi-autobiographical drama, which won a Sundance Grand Jury Prize.

Stitches

Stitches

The loss of a child haunts a needleworker who doggedly looks for answers to her own history and uncovers a troubling system of deception in Miroslav Terzić’s affecting second film.

Sunset

Sunset

Winner of the FIPRESCI Prize at the 2018 Venice Film Festival, this allegorical mystery offers a decadent premonition of Europe in chaos.

Swallow

Swallow

Haley Bennett won Best Actress at the Tribeca Film Festival for her portrayal of a newly pregnant woman with a seemingly perfect home and husband in this boldly satirical psychological feminist thriller.

Sword of Trust

Sword of Trust

Marc Maron teams up with Lynn Shelton for a rambling, lovable comedy of small town grifters and Civil War truthers.

System Crasher

System Crasher

A wrenching tale of a foster child pushing a system to its limits, System Crasher picked up the Alfred Bauer Prize at the Berlinale.

Take Me Somewhere Nice

Take Me Somewhere Nice

A cool, idiosyncratic debut feature (and award winner) from Ena Sendijanević about a young woman on a surreal journey of self-discovery into the Bosnian homeland she doesn’t know.

Them That Follow

Them That Follow

With a star-studded cast that includes Olivia Colman and Walton Goggins, Them That Follow examines an overtly religious, Pentecostal society that has cut itself off from the rest of the world.

Tommaso

Tommaso

“Abel Ferrara digs deep into his personal life to deliver a sweet, honest character study of a man struggling with guilt and anxiety.” – Little White Lies

The Tomorrow Man

The Tomorrow Man

John Lithgow and Blythe Danner star together in this eccentric later-in-life love story.

Too Late to Die Young

Too Late to Die Young

When democracy returns to Chile in 1990, a group of families flee the city in this emotionally poignant, visually sumptuous portrait of youth – the 2018 Locarno winner for Best Direction in the festival’s international competition.

The Unknown Saint

The Unknown Saint

“A droll, entertaining, absurdist fable about spirituality and greed that signals an important new talent.” – Variety

Vai

Vai

Eight female directors from eight separate Pacific Island nations celebrate Indigenous resilience and creativity through the life of one extraordinary woman.

Vivarium

Vivarium

Jesse Eisenberg and Imogen Poots star as a young couple trapped in a nightmarish suburban labyrinth in this bold sci-fi/horror from Irish filmmaker Lorcan Finnegan.

We Are Little Zombies

We Are Little Zombies

Reality ain’t worth crying about for four teens numbed by tragedy who decide to form a technicolour pop-electronica band in this riotous yet emotionally trenchant feature debut from the award-winning Makoto Nagahisa.

The Whistlers

The Whistlers

The Romanian New Wave ventures to the Canary Islands in Corneliu Porumboiu’s noir-ish crime caper, which takes more than a few cues from Hitchcock, gleefully name-checks John Ford and plays up the writer/director’s own offbeat sensibilities.

A Woman Alone

A Woman Alone

Banned for six years, then censored by the state when it finally aired on television, Agnieszka Holland’s last film before emigrating from Poland examines the desolate lives of the poor and disabled during the country’s Solidarity era.

Working Woman

Working Woman

The question often asked of women who experience sexual harassment is: why don’t they just leave? Working Woman shows us precisely why it’s not that simple.