International Films – Europe

Alice

Alice

Josephine Mackerras’s SXSW Grand Jury Prize winner is an intimate story of one woman’s empowerment that also destigmatises common ideas about sex work.

And Then We Danced

And Then We Danced

A young dancer’s outlook is challenged by his intense attraction to a rival in Georgia, a country that remains deeply rooted in tradition, in this contender for Cannes’ Queer Palm.

Angelo

Angelo

An 18th-century African boy, kidnapped into slavery, rises through the ranks of Viennese high society in this powerful, formally stunning work.

Angry Harvest

Angry Harvest

An act of kindness becomes a terrifying trap in Agnieszka Holland’s Oscar-nominated drama about a woman on the run through World War II Poland who becomes an object of fascination and possession for a local farmer.

Animals

Animals

Alia Shawkat and Holliday Grainger give a beautiful authenticity to Australian director Sophie Hyde’s adaptation of the acclaimed novel that Caitlin Moran described as "Withnail & I for girls".

Bait

Bait

Class divisions and the threat of gentrification tear apart culture and community in a small fishing village in this arresting fusion of social realism and avant-garde filmmaking.

Beanpole

Beanpole

Winner of both the coveted Best Director award and the FIPRESCI prize in Cannes’ Un Certain Regard section, Russian director Kantemir Balagov’s second feature is a fiercely devastating tale of two women rebuilding their lives in the shadow of World War II.

Beats

Beats

Journey back to the halcyon daze of the UK’s 90s rave scene with this nostalgic coming-of-age tale, executive produced by Steven Soderbergh and set to the most electrifying sounds of the Trainspotting era.

Benjamin

Benjamin

A fable of faltering romance and a withering satire of the artistic temperament from UK comic Simon Amstell.

Bros: After the Screaming Stops

Bros: After the Screaming Stops

Who would have predicted that a doc about ’80s boy band Bros would be hailed as “the best music film since This is Spinal Tap” and even “the best music documentary of all time”? You’ll have to see it to believe it.

Burning Bush

Burning Bush

Agnieszka Holland’s searing three-part opus recounts the fiery sacrifice of a young Prague student protesting the Soviet occupation of Czechoslovakia in 1969.

Buñuel in the Labyrinth of Turtles

Buñuel in the Labyrinth of Turtles

This absorbing animated effort tells the tale behind an inimitable cinematic talent and one of his most controversial works: avant-garde Spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel and his 1933 short documentary Las Hurdes.

Cleo: If I Could Turn Back Time

Cleo: If I Could Turn Back Time

The city of Berlin, and its history, star alongside a luminous Marleen Lohse in this playful, joyous and visually inventive story about a magical clock and a young woman’s desire to rewind time.

Cold Case Hammarskjöld

Cold Case Hammarskjöld

“This could either be the world’s biggest murder mystery, or the world’s most idiotic conspiracy theory.” – Mads Brügger

Cool Daddio: The Second Youth of R. Stevie Moore

Cool Daddio: The Second Youth of R. Stevie Moore

Four hundred albums in, the secret godfather of indie rock R. Stevie Moore is finally leaving the bedroom.

The Cremator

The Cremator

A damning political parable banned in its native Czechoslovakia, Juraj Herz’s deeply unsettling film chronicles the corruption of a crematorium director in the face of the 20th century’s greatest horror.

The Day Shall Come

The Day Shall Come

Once again filtering today’s bleak political reality through a scathingly satirical lens, provocateur Chris Morris (Four Lions, MIFF 2010) takes inspiration from a hundred true stories with this Anna Kendrick-starring counterterrorism farce.

Deerskin

Deerskin

Thanks to one very special jacket, it’s open season on killer style – and on filmmaking itself.

Dirty God

Dirty God

Dutch director Sacha Polak (Hemel, Zurich) makes her English-language debut with this visually expressive, emotionally raw and thematically topical account of a South London woman’s determined fight to reclaim her life.

Distant Voices, Still Lives

Distant Voices, Still Lives

Terence Davies’ moving memoir of family life in working-class Liverpool during the 1940s and 1950s is gorgeously restored to mark its 30th anniversary.

The Duke of Burgundy

The Duke of Burgundy

Dominance, bondage and lepidopterology – what more could you want from a love story? Peter Strickland’s third film hums with desire as Sidse Babett Knudsen and Chiara D’Anna create a fluttering cacophony of lovers at play and at odds.

Europa Europa

Europa Europa

Truth is stranger than fiction in Agnieszka Holland’s Golden Globe-winning masterwork about a young Jewish man who survives World War II as a member of the Hitler Youth.

Evelyn

Evelyn

Oscar-winning filmmaker Orlando von Einseidel turns the lens on himself and the ghosts that have haunted his family.

Extra Ordinary

Extra Ordinary

Will Forte, Australian comedian Claudia O'Doherty and Irish stand-up Maeve Higgins ain’t afraid of no ghosts in this supernatural side-splitter, an audience favourite at this year’s SXSW.

Fever

Fever

Released in 1981 and immediately banned by the communist government, Agnieszka Holland’s striking film about anarchists and a bomb is a powerful exploration of revolutionary ideals.

Fire Will Come

Fire Will Come

Winner of the Un Certain Regard Jury Prize at Cannes, the latest from Franco-Spanish auteur Oliver Laxe returns the director to his Galician roots for a mesmerising tale of a mysterious arsonist and the forces of nature.

Frankie

Frankie

Starring Isabelle Huppert as a famous French actress, Frankie is the latest intimately observed, tenderly wrought drama from Ira Sachs – with Marisa Tomei, Brendan Gleeson, Greg Kinnear and Jérémie Renier also featuring.

Funan

Funan

Winner of Best Feature Film at the 2018 Annecy International Animated Film Festival, and featuring the voices of Bérénice Bejo and Louis Garrel, this meticulous, hand-drawn recreation of Cambodian life under the Khmer Rouge isn’t easily forgotten.

God Exists, Her Name is Petrunya

God Exists, Her Name is Petrunya

This multiple Berlinale award winner from North Macedonia is a savage and hilarious feminist polemic against patriarchal control.

Happy New Year, Colin Burstead

Happy New Year, Colin Burstead

“Ben Wheatley strips things way back for his nerve-raddled family reunion comedy, and the result is one of his best, most fluid films.” – Variety

I Lost My Body

I Lost My Body

A severed hand goes in search of its owner in this endlessly inventive, surprisingly moving animated adventure that won the Cannes Critics Week Grand Prix.

In Darkness

In Darkness

Nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the 2012 Academy Awards, Agnieszka Holland’s starkly realistic World War II drama explores a complex true tale of Holocaust heroism.

I Was at Home, But

I Was at Home, But

Charting a widowed mother’s unusual reaction to the disappearance of her teenage son, this unconventional family portrait by Angela Schanelec took home this year’s Berlinale Silver Bear for Best Director.

Journey to a Mother's Room

Journey to a Mother's Room

A touching portrait of a mother-daughter relationship and life in an empty nest from one of Catalan cinema’s up-and-coming directors.

The Juniper Tree

The Juniper Tree

Beautifully restored in 4K, the feature-film debut of Björk is a dreamy, monochromatic poem of a film that gives a feminist twist to a lesser-known Brothers Grimm fairytale.

Katalin Varga

Katalin Varga

Peter Strickland’s low-budget debut is an unsettling and slow-burning tale of revenge and redemption that announced the arrival of a major new British filmmaking talent.

Koko-Di Koko-Da

Koko-Di Koko-Da

Death comes for a bereaved young couple – again and again and again – in this weird and wild horror fable set deep in the creepy Nordic woods.

Kursk

Kursk

Thomas Vinterberg directs Matthias Schoenaerts, Léa Seydoux, Colin Firth and Max von Sydow in this captivating and suspenseful true tale, recounting the final hours of the supposedly unsinkable K-141 Kursk submarine as it descends to the bottom of the Barents Sea.

Les Misérables

Les Misérables

Tensions between violent cops and neighbourhood youth explode in this fiery, Cannes Jury Prize-winning film from director Ladj Ly, who brings the spirit of Victor Hugo to the cultural skirmishes of the Parisian suburbs.

Maiden

Maiden

“An all-women crew’s entry in a fabled around-the-world yacht race gets a lively retelling in this exciting, inspiring documentary.” — Variety

Man of Marble

Man of Marble

Agnieszka Holland collaborated with the great Andrzej Wajda on this powerful Citizen Kane-like reckoning with the legacy of a lionised construction worker and the hypocrisy of the Soviet regime, which won the FIPRESCI Prize at Cannes 1978.

Mr. Jones

Mr. Jones

Veteran director Agnieszka Holland unearths an essential chapter of history with this biopic about Welsh journalist Gareth Jones and his efforts to expose Soviet atrocities during the 1930s.

Noah Land

Noah Land

Winning Best Actor and Best Screenplay at the Tribeca Film Festival, this Turkish drama contemplates faith, trust and the trappings of masculinity, earning comparisons to Abbas Kiarostami’s filmography for its poignant, contemplative approach.

Official Secrets

Official Secrets

Keira Knightley leads a star-studded cast in this true-story thriller about Katharine Gun, the British secret service whistleblower who tried to stop the Iraq War.

Once in Trubchevsk

Once in Trubchevsk

Larisa Sadilova’s first film in nearly a decade is a richly textured portrait of a daring woman’s desires as they play out within the confines of small-town Russian life.

Pain and Glory

Pain and Glory

The acclaimed and adored Pedro Almodóvar reunites with actors Antonio Banderas – who won the Cannes Best Actor prize – and Penélope Cruz in a vibrant, provocative and nostalgic homage to an endlessly fascinating topic: himself

Particles

Particles

Teenage kicks and the Large Hadron Collider come together for the first time in this striking mix of coming-of-age drama and eerie sci-fi dread from adventurous new voice, Blaise Harrison.

PJ Harvey: A Dog Called Money

PJ Harvey: A Dog Called Money

In this dynamic, globe-trotting mix of travelogue and music documentary, revered rocker PJ Harvey roams the world in search of inspiration for a recording project.

Portrait of a Lady on Fire

Portrait of a Lady on Fire

Girlhood director Céline Sciamma returns with this beautifully calibrated, incandescent romance between a painter and her subject, which took home both Best Screenplay and the Queer Palm at this year’s Cannes.

Provincial Actors

Provincial Actors

Agnieszka Holland’s compelling, FIPRESCI Prize-winning debut film goes behind the scenes of a theatre troupe to explore the human cost of censorship and ideological conflict in communist Poland.

Queen of Hearts

Queen of Hearts

Trine Dyrholm is magnetic in this Sundance Audience Award winner about the abuse of power and just how far we’ll go to hold on to our comfortable existence.

Ray & Liz

Ray & Liz

Revered photographer Richard Billingham revisits his coming of age in a chaotic council flat in the 1980s, portraying it with a tender, melancholy beauty full of subtle humour and pathos.

A Regular Woman

A Regular Woman

The real-life ‘honour’ killing of a young Turkish-Kurdish woman is given a unique narrative treatment by German-American filmmaker Sherry Hormann in this empathetic and uncompromising film.

Retrospekt

Retrospekt

A bold psychological drama about women, work and domestic violence that rejects clichés and treads a thin line between experimental and narrative filmmaking.

Rosie

Rosie

Homelessness takes centre stage in this heartbreaking and urgent portrait of one working-class family’s increasingly desperate search for sanctuary amid Ireland’s housing crisis.

Seven Beauties

Seven Beauties

A stunning new restoration of the great Lina Wertmüller’s multiple-Oscar-nominated classic, a bitingly funny and savage look at fascism that retains its bracing power to unnerve.

Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors

Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors

“Sergei Parajanov’s extraordinary merging of myth, history, poetry, ethnography, dance and ritual remains one of the supreme works of the Soviet sound cinema, and even subsequent Parajanov features have failed to dim its intoxicating splendors.” – Chicago Reader

Sorry We Missed You

Sorry We Missed You

“Another passionate bulletin from the heart of modern Britain, the land of zero-hours vassalage and service-economy serfdom – a film in the tradition of Loach’s previous work and reaching back to Vittorio De Sica’s Bicycle Thieves.” – The Guardian

The Souvenir

The Souvenir

Tilda Swinton stars alongside her daughter, Honor Swinton Byrne – a revelation – in Joanna Hogg’s intimate semi-autobiographical drama, which won a Sundance Grand Jury Prize.

Stitches

Stitches

The loss of a child haunts a needleworker who doggedly looks for answers to her own history and uncovers a troubling system of deception in Miroslav Terzić’s affecting second film.

Sátántangó

Sátántangó

Restored to mark its 25th anniversary, Béla Tarr’s breathtaking magnum opus is an examination of time and human decline set in a Hungarian village during the dying days of communism.

Suede: The Insatiable Ones

Suede: The Insatiable Ones

“Painfully honest and deeply moving … Mike Christie’s portrait of Brett Anderson’s 1990s glam-pop outsiders gets everything right.” – The Sunday Times

Sunset

Sunset

Winner of the FIPRESCI Prize at the 2018 Venice Film Festival, this allegorical mystery offers a decadent premonition of Europe in chaos.

The Swallows of Kabul

The Swallows of Kabul

Love in a time of tyranny: this stunning animation directed by the two-woman team of Zabou Breitman and Eléa Gobbé-Mévellec chronicles life under the Taliban, and bravely doesn’t shy away from either brutality or hope.

System Crasher

System Crasher

A wrenching tale of a foster child pushing a system to its limits, System Crasher picked up the Alfred Bauer Prize at the Berlinale.

Take Me Somewhere Nice

Take Me Somewhere Nice

A cool, idiosyncratic debut feature (and award winner) from Ena Sendijanević about a young woman on a surreal journey of self-discovery into the Bosnian homeland she doesn’t know.

Tommaso

Tommaso

“Abel Ferrara digs deep into his personal life to deliver a sweet, honest character study of a man struggling with guilt and anxiety.” – Little White Lies

Vivarium

Vivarium

Jesse Eisenberg and Imogen Poots star as a young couple trapped in a nightmarish suburban labyrinth in this bold sci-fi/horror from Irish filmmaker Lorcan Finnegan.

The Whistlers

The Whistlers

The Romanian New Wave ventures to the Canary Islands in Corneliu Porumboiu’s noir-ish crime caper, which takes more than a few cues from Hitchcock, gleefully name-checks John Ford and plays up the writer/director’s own offbeat sensibilities.

Young Ahmed

Young Ahmed

Belgium’s acclaimed Dardenne brothers scooped Cannes’ Best Director prize for this provocative but ultimately tender tale of an Islamic teenager who falls under the influence of an extremist.