Director in Focus: Peter Strickland

In celebration of singular British director Peter Strickland’s newest work of art, In Fabric, MIFF is proud to present a retrospective of his feature films accompanied by a mini program of shorts and features that have inspired the director – selected by Strickland himself especially for MIFF audiences. On the MIFF blog, he talks more about these selections. 

Known for his love of Italian giallo and Spanish sexploitation in particular, and for his dedication to manipulating mood with lush but disturbing sound and visuals, Strickland first came to international prominence with 2009’s multi-award-winning Katalin Varga, a rural film noir examining of the circular nature of violence. 2012’s Berberian Sound Studio and 2014’s The Duke of Burgundy cemented his growing reputation as truly unique filmmaker, beloved for his deliciously fetishistic genre homages. For MIFF 2019, each of Strickland’s feature films will screen with one of his short films.

Don’t miss this unique opportunity to not only immerse yourself in Strickland’s incredible oeuvre, but in his influences and his cinephilia, and to draw the lines between the two.

Berberian Sound Studio

Berberian Sound Studio

Chopping up more cabbage than a hipster sauerkraut artisan, an English foley artist hired for a lurid Italian giallo film becomes unhinged in Peter Strickland’s highly unnerving 2012 feature that warns of the deceptive nature of cinematic sound.

The Cremator

The Cremator

A damning political parable banned in its native Czechoslovakia, Juraj Herz’s deeply unsettling film chronicles the corruption of a crematorium director in the face of the 20th century’s greatest horror.

The Duke of Burgundy

The Duke of Burgundy

Dominance, bondage and lepidopterology – what more could you want from a love story? Peter Strickland’s third film hums with desire as Sidse Babett Knudsen and Chiara D’Anna create a fluttering cacophony of lovers at play and at odds.

In Fabric

In Fabric

Peter Strickland is beloved for his exquisitely tactile, European genre homages and his unsettling command of mood. But this screamingly funny, Fassbinder-does-giallo fable, which follows a cursed dress thirsting for blood, is outré even for him.

Katalin Varga

Katalin Varga

Peter Strickland’s low-budget debut is an unsettling and slow-burning tale of revenge and redemption that announced the arrival of a major new British filmmaking talent.

MIFF Talks - Peter Strickland In Conversation

MIFF Talks - Peter Strickland In Conversation

As one of MIFF’s Directors in Focus this year, Peter Strickland will visit Melbourne to present his new film, In Fabric, as well as retrospective screenings of his previous films and screenings of classic films that have inspired him. During this special event, he will discuss his career, his filmography and his own cinephilia.
Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors

Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors

“Sergei Parajanov’s extraordinary merging of myth, history, poetry, ethnography, dance and ritual remains one of the supreme works of the Soviet sound cinema, and even subsequent Parajanov features have failed to dim its intoxicating splendors.” – Chicago Reader

Strickland Selections

Strickland Selections

One of the UK’s, if not the world’s, most singular directors, Peter Strickland has a very distinct style. As part of our retrospective of his works, Strickland has selected for MIFF five seminal short films that have inspired his vision.

Trash

Trash

Legendary Factory director Paul Morrissey’s transgressive tale of down-and-out sex and drugs in underground New York remains a highlight of his collaborations with Andy Warhol.