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Jean-Pierre Léaud

Jean-Pierre Léaud has been called the child of the French New Wave, but he has grown up and grown old within an entire world of cinema. After defining roles in the 1960s and ‘70s, he became a father-figure to a later generation of French directors, and filmmakers from other cultures – Finland, Hungary, Poland, Brazil, Italy and Taiwan – have been drawn to him as inspiration and talisman. He has a gift for physical comedy, a singular approach to dialogue and a distinctive, sometimes haunting presence that’s always been, throughout his long and varied creative life, at the service of the director.

Co-curated with Philippa Hawker.

For further background, read Philippa Hawker's essay in the Jean-Pierre Léaud dossier at Senses of Cinema.

 

THE 400 BLOWS

THE 400 BLOWS

(99 mins)
Dir. François Truffaut | France, 1959
Antoine and Colette

Antoine and Colette

(32 mins)
Dir. François Truffaut | France, 1962
THE DEPARTURE

THE DEPARTURE

(91 mins)
Dir. Jerzy Skolimowski | Belgium, 1967
FATHER CHRISTMAS HAS BLUE EYES

FATHER CHRISTMAS HAS BLUE EYES

(46 mins)
Dir. Jean Eustache | France, 1965
I HIRED A CONTRACT KILLER

I HIRED A CONTRACT KILLER

(80 mins)
Dir. Aki Kaurismäki | Finland,France,Germany,Sweden,UK, 1990
IRMA VEP

IRMA VEP

(99 mins)
Dir. Olivier Assayas | France, 1996
MASCULIN FÉMININ

MASCULIN FÉMININ

(106 mins)
Dir. Jean-Luc Godard | France, 1966
THE MOTHER AND THE WHORE

THE MOTHER AND THE WHORE

(220 mins)
Dir. Jean Eustache | France, 1973
OUT 1: NOLI ME TANGERE

OUT 1: NOLI ME TANGERE

(208 mins)
Dir. Jacques Rivette | France, 1971